NOTES ON HEADSTONE LOGS

1. The graveyard has been divided into four areas A-D (see Graveyard plan). Each of these four areas has been divided into numbered rows, for example A1-A29. Each headstone has a unique reference number. For example A.1.1 lies in Section A, row 1 and is the first headstone in that row. Headstone B5.2 is in Section B, row 5 and is the second headstone. Each person commemorated has a separate entry in the logs, so for headstone A1.1 which commemorates three people, there are three entries in the log.

 

2. Some of the headstones mark graves. Some graves are unmarked. Some headstones are not on the site of a grave but are merely commemorative.

 

3. The rows were created for this project and attempt to organise headstones erected at many different periods of history. Therefore they are not straight! Please refer to plan provided.

 

a. In area A, the row numbers start near the gate and progress eastwards whilst numbering for each headstone progresses northwards away from the church.

 

b. In area B, the row numbers start near the church and progress eastwards whilst numbering for each headstone progresses northwards.

 

c. In area C, the row numbers start near the church and progress westwards whilst numbering for each headstone progresses southwards, away from the church.

 

d. In area D rows 1-8 are south of the garden of remembrance. For these rows, the row numbers start near the church and progress westwards whilst numbering for each headstone progresses southwards. For rows 9-16 (north of the garden of remembrance), row numbers start near the hearse house and run towards the church, whilst numbering for each headstone progresses northwards towards the main gate.

4. Where only the year of birth or death is shown, ages have been calculated by calendar year.

5. Some place names were spelled differently in the past, for example Fotherley sometimes appears as Fortherly or Fatherly. There may be spelling mistakes, but don’t assume so!

 

6. Following on from the above, please contact us through the website if you find obvious errors, especially if you have access to family records which were transcribed a few years ago. Weathering has caused some headstones to deteriorate significantly.

 

7. The ‘Residence’ column contains the name of the place (if mentioned) in the inscription which usually appears in the form ‘John Smith of Anytown’. This may simply be the family home or place of birth, rather than the deceased’s address at time of death.

 

8. The ‘Place of Death’ column contains the name of a place (if mentioned) in the inscription which usually appears in the form ‘John Smith who died at Anytown’.

 

9. Where an inscription is unreadable, if this applies to the whole inscription, the entry will say so. If only some words are unreadable, this will be indicated by a series of dots ‘..........’ or a question mark ‘?’. Those cells which as a result are incomplete are shown highlighted.

 

10. Notes about the condition of a headstone or details about an inscription are written in italics. Spade needed indicates that part of an inscription is now concealed beneath soil level. Uncovering these will take place after coronavirus restrictions have been eased.

 

6 May 2020